Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. Rep:
    ThreeFN's Avatar
    Posts
    557
    Points
    1,272
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Default

    Re: tinting with rit dye black, but ended up looking brownish?

    Remove this ad: become a supporter
    Quote Originally Posted by jenny View Post
    I am using PETG plastic. will try four packs and get back with you guys.
    Good to know you're using the 'right' plastic. Acrylic plastic, or namely plexiglass, has a nasty tendency to yellow with age. I was thinking maybe the browning was actually a combination of yellowing brought on by the hot water or the solvent in the RIT dye.

    I'd follow Rabids advice if you're inclined to use the dye. I'm thinking of giving RIT another chance following Rabid's method (I can't remember how we did ours but it obviously didn't work).

    spray tint (aka nightshades) offends me deeply on a personal level [rant] I hate blacked out taillights on cars, THEY'RE UNGODLY UNSAFE PEOPLE AND SOMEONE WILL DIE BECAUSE THEY CAN'T SEE THE DAMN BRAKE LIGHTS [/rant] but it has been met with mixed success by users. It's a precise skill to apply it without 'running' or 'hazing' and requires A LOT of trial and error. Voplin is probably one of the most successful users.

    Tint film should work great for a Thomas helmet that has a simple, 'single curve' visor in it like most do. Apply the tint to the plastic, and bend it into shape. With a thin enough sheet of PETG you should be able to 'temporarily' bend it into the right radius and then glue in place. It's much harder to use on Guy visors because of the complex curvature. I don't know if I've heard of many success stories on that end, aside from the technique Thomas suggests.

    In theory, most tint film is just thin PETG plastic with an adhesive added to the one side. It may be possible to apply the tint film to the plastic before vacuum forming since both the sheet and the film are the same plastic and will have the same transition temperature and other properties. Don't know if I've heard any success stories on that one either.
    Adage: "To continuously one up itself"
    Corollary: "And by proxy all others"
    Extension: "Including Daft Punk themselves"
    YOUTUBE BLOG FLICKR Photobucket
    Currently Working On: code base 3.0, auxiliary lighting, lightbars of DOOM

  2. Rep:
    Posts
    108
    Points
    569
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Default

    Re: tinting with rit dye black, but ended up looking brownish?

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeFN View Post
    In theory, most tint film is just thin PETG plastic with an adhesive added to the one side. It may be possible to apply the tint film to the plastic before vacuum forming since both the sheet and the film are the same plastic and will have the same transition temperature and other properties.
    I remember digging though this forum a couple years ago when CRSHCTR (i may have mis-spelled his name) still posted. He ran some tests with roll-on tint and vacuumforming PETG. As I recall, there was some success but a fairly high failure rate, namely due to moisture being trapped between layers and boiling out during the heating process, causing some ugly deformation and bubbling.

    I did niteshades for my Guy helmet, and it works... okay. Its opaque enough to block out all incoming light if done correctly, but you can still project through it fairly well. If you're not planning to do LEDs behind your helmet, its certainly a solution. The overall finish is a bit hazy, but I was able to help visibility in my helmet by lightly buffing the interior surface with swirl remover to even out the finish.

    Lights off:

    Lights on:


    Click for the full resolution of the image above and you can see the real problem. This paint is incredibly thin, and likes to fisheye and pool around deposits. You can see 2 small black dots in the turquoise bar (collections of paint around dust) and a small light halo in the yellow bar (this is a fisheye caused by residual moisture or oil on the visor)

    You can also see the "grain" look int he paint. Again, a byproduct of it being very thin and difficult to spray evenly. Mine took about 6 coats of very very thin coverage to get to this point.

    For Thomas, I'm going to be trying auto tint as well as attempting the PET and RIT dye route. We'll see which wins out. Going forward, I doubt I'll go back to nite-shades.

  3. Redorangeyellowgreen
    Default

    Re: tinting with rit dye black, but ended up looking brownish?

    I see what you mean about the RIT being a cheap thing to do, but RIT is an ink, it's meant to dye fabric and specifically cling to cotton. I can imagine the plastic not absorbing the RIT and you end up with a flaky black visor, which will also NOT be able to be seen through. SO, Autozone, Kragen/ O'reily autoparts, and so on, will have a GLASS tinting spray just like stated above, not as cheap (10-15 dollars). But it will most likely be a one-time only great result choice

  4. Rep:
    Posts
    630
    Points
    2,126
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Default

    Re: tinting with rit dye black, but ended up looking brownish?

    Actually the RIT dye stains the plastic. When you heat the water + dye and soak your PET plastic in the solution, the heat opens the pores in the plastic allowing the dye to penetrate the surface. Furthermore dipping it in cool water in between soaking's will close the pores sealing the dye in the plastic. It is not a coating that will flake or peel off. Everytime I use this process I ALWAYS use multiple test pieces to figure out how many soakings I will need to do, and for how long to achive the desired depth of color.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Black Eyed Peas
    By DJPixcell in forum General Music
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 27th Apr 2013, 01:35
  2. Daft punk in anoj top 10 black ops
    By dj_avataR in forum General Daft Punk
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24th Dec 2010, 01:18
  3. What song(s) played after the show ended?
    By futureproof in forum Live
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 20th Nov 2008, 04:46