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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheVertigo View Post
    Daft Punk's Fresh
    Can you share that sample?


    Quote Originally Posted by churro View Post
    guys zeememba to pwezz ze play buttone on ableton for ze show to start.

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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

    Quote Originally Posted by TheVertigo View Post
    Is there a way to chop up the samples? I have tried to do that in ACID but it doesn't sound so good.
    Beatmap your sample and get the tempo of the project to be the same as the original sample. Just listen to it and try to "feel" a good sample. Try singing it if you have to. Not every sample sounds good (or better) chopped up.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheVertigo View Post
    Oh i see, so do need to ask permission for royalty-free loops and samples as well?
    Hahahaha. No you don't. That's why they're called "royalty-free". A royalty is money you pay an artist/band for using their song in any way, shape, or form (commercials, movies, TV shows, sampling, etc.). If something is "royalty-free", you may use it without paying or telling the original creator that you're using it.



    Quote Originally Posted by TheVertigo View Post
    I lived in Malaysia, it's a country close to Singapore and the cost for DJ equipments costs to the thousands and there are limited stores selling them so i heavily rely on my ACID Pro and free samples and disco cover vocals for my music.
    That's terrible, eh! I feel sorry for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheVertigo View Post
    Oh i have, mostly from my dad's old CDs, fortunately he had a Best of The Bee Gees CD so i could start from there.
    That's cool. My mom was a fan of the funk groups of the 70s and 80s. Earth, Wind, and Fire and The Doobie Brothers seem to dominate her collection (which is mine now ). She just got some new records, but I don't have a record player to listen to them on.

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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

    hardware isn't really essential (as far as i can tell). surely, it does have its benefits, but unless you have a specific reason to buy that particular hardware, don't bother (unless that reason is to experiment, then go for it, if you're willing to spend that kind of money).

    as for software, acid pro should be fine shouldn't it?
    i haven't used it myself, but if there's one thing i know about creative endeavors, it's that you can't blame your tools if your work output isn't good.
    even the most basic of software can take a sample of a track and make something of it.

    for now, just try to explore acid pro and see what you can make of it.
    don't be quick to assume it can't accomplish what you're after, because surely you could whip up some relatively decent tracks with it.

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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

    Sorry, i don't have a sample, i mainly try to re-create the specific sample by ear.

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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

    Beatmap your sample and get the tempo of the project to be the same as the original sample
    That's one of my problems, beatmapping. Not very good at that, i mainly try to speed it up or slow it down and cover it up with filters, it works sometimes but most of the times it's noticeable.

    If something is "royalty-free", you may use it without paying or telling the original creator that you're using it.
    Oh i see, silly me.

    That's terrible, eh! I feel sorry for you.
    It's okay, it's harder without hardware but i may get used to the softwares.

    That's cool. My mom was a fan of the funk groups of the 70s and 80s. Earth, Wind, and Fire and The Doobie Brothers seem to dominate her collection (which is mine now ). She just got some new records, but I don't have a record player to listen to them on.
    Oh i'm sorry, but if i know there are very cheap record players online.

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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

    hardware isn't really essential (as far as i can tell). surely, it does have its benefits, but unless you have a specific reason to buy that particular hardware, don't bother (unless that reason is to experiment, then go for it, if you're willing to spend that kind of money).
    Well experimentation yes but also i wanna get the feel of it, the feel of being behind the deck mixing the beats. I think of it as a very hard but fun game.

    as for software, acid pro should be fine shouldn't it?
    It's fine but it has it's limitations.

    even the most basic of software can take a sample of a track and make something of it.
    Oh i know, i sampled Daft Punk's Something About Us and used it on a track and it is beautiful.

    for now, just try to explore acid pro and see what you can make of it.
    don't be quick to assume it can't accomplish what you're after, because surely you could whip up some relatively decent tracks with it.
    ACID Pro is a pretty decent software i can say that, and as for relatively decent tracks pretty much all of my songs are relatively decent but when it comes to remixing it is just very hard to do the sampling and such.

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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

    [Get ready for a bunch of information that will probably confuse you more than help you ]

    A note on hardware - you definitely don't need it. You can get by using software alone.

    That being said, some hardware can give you a certain sound that can be hard to achieve otherwise. This is especially relevant to you since you lean towards the "old guard" French House artists (like Le Knight Club, Sedat, Together, DJ Falcon, Daft Punk [pre-HAA], Paul Johnson [though he predated a lot of the other artists and he isn't French], etc...).

    Pretty much all of the French House/Filter House tracks up until after the release of Daft Punk's Discovery used hardware samplers, with the most popular ones being the E-mu SP-12 and the E-mu SP-1200 (the Akai MPC60 is another good one, though that's kind of noisy sounding). Stardust's Music Sounds Better With You, along with both of Together's tracks, most of Alan Braxe's tracks, all of Thomas Bangalter's sample-based solo tracks, and (I think) all of the Le Knight Club tracks, used the E-mu SP-1200. Daft Punk's Discovery album features heavy use of the SP-1200 too. Their Homework album seems to mostly feature the SP-12 IIRC.

    You may be wondering why this matters. Well, the limitations of the old samplers (most of which were 12-bit instead of the 16 or 24 bitrates that are common today) meant that the sounds were kind of distorted and crushed. This has a HUGE impact of the sound, especially on the sound of the drums. Seriously, you can load a 909 kick drum sound into a SP-1200 and it completely transforms it into this gritty, punchy, heavy kick drum. It is *the* Roule kick drum. It also makes samples of tracks sound great, in this "dirty" sort of way - listen to the music sample in Music Sounds Better With You to hear this. Check out this video to see Alan Braxe briefly demonstrating SP-1200 (using his classic track with Fred Falke, "Intro"): http://vimeo.com/6606574

    It's also worth mentioning that, as you probably saw in that Alan Braxe video, these samplers could be and were played like instruments. This had a huge impact on arrangements (and probably led to a lot of the more organic arrangements that are prevalent in French House).

    The bad news? You can only get these things second-hand, and they are expensive. You see, everybody wants one (even if they don't know it yet haha). The demand is expanded even more by the fact that these units are legendary in hip hop and are style used by hip hop producers today. Even some House producers, like Alan Braxe, still stick to these boxes. Of course, some of the units are a lot cheaper (like the SP-12, the SP-1200's baby brother, or the pad-centric MPC60, which has an extremely gritty sound), but they also have fewer features and a much shorter sample time. The SP-12, for example, only has a few seconds of sample time available in memory, so it's really only good for one short sample or for drums. The Akai S900 and Akai S950 are also pretty good (and have a nice sound), though those are rackmounted so they don't have the playability. You can look up more info on individual samplers on a website like VintageSynth.com or on Wikipedia

    If you don't want to, or can't, go the hardware route, then your best bet to get these sort of gritty sounds is to get a good software bit crusher. I highly, highly, highly recommend d16's excellent plugin "Decimort." It's only 39 euros, and it can get you very close to an SP-1200-style sound (in fact, it has a SP-1200 preset). Unlike other bit crushers, Decimort actually emulates the entire signal path of a classic sampler, so you get the bit crushing and downsampling, but you also get emulation of the A/D and D/A convertors, emulation of circuit crosstalk, input and internal distortion, analog-style filters (like those on the old samplers), etc... You can check it out and hear sound demos here: http://www.d16.pl/index.php?menu=203

    If I were you, I'd go the Decimort route for now to decide if that's the sound you want. If you decide you really like that sound and want to go full swing into it, then I suggest you try picking up either a MPC60 or a SP-12 - you should be able to find both on eBay pretty consistently (though I'm not sure how shopping on eBay works in Malaysia?). If you really want to go for it and drop a few thousand US$, then get a SP-1200.

    If you're looking for another example of the SP-1200 and some of its features, you can find Philippe Zdar (of Cassius) clumsily demonstrating it near the end of this video: http://www.redbullmusicacademy.com/l...-la-resistance

    Here's a video of a SP-12 Turbo (the Turbo is an upgraded SP-12, kind of a "SP-12 Model 2"): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBEvP...feature=fvwrel

    PS: If you ever get an old sampler, then you must learn the speed-up-the-sample trick. This was used to get around the sample time limitations, but it also gave the samples a unique sound. When sampling off of vinyl, the producers would often speed the vinyl up. This would make the length of the sample shorter (since the record was being played faster), so it would take up less time in the sampler's memory. Once it was in the sampler, they would then pitch the sample down to slow it to its original tempo. This gave the sample a great, unique sound. You can see that demonstrated in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoWV33HvQJg

    You can actually do a similar thing in software and get a somewhat similar sound.

    PSS: Please excuse any typos - I'm tired

    PSSS: Btw, Acid Pro is actually really good software for this sort of thing. For a while, it was *the* software for sample and loop based music (with pretty much every computer-based drum n bass producer using it). If you are looking for an upgrade or switch though, you may want to look at Ableton Live. It is setup kind of similar to Acid Pro, and it has the same sound stretching features, though in a much more intuitive way imho. A lot of the French House artists now use it, including Daft Punk, Fred Falke, and (I think) Alan Braxe.

    EDIT:
    Oh, I almost forgot! If you are looking for great SP-1200-style drums but don't want to buy a SP-1200 or use a plugin, you should check out Goldbaby's sample packs. He has some SP-1200 packs that are full of great sounding drums. If you're looking for a Roule-style drum sound, this is a great way to get it without worrying about the other stuff. Here are two of the SP-1200 packs: http://www.goldbaby.co.nz/sp1200.html & http://www.goldbaby.co.nz/sp1200vol2.html He also has a lot of other great sounding packs (notably the MPC60 ones, if you're going for that gritty sound)- http://www.goldbaby.co.nz/products.html - and even some free ones (including two small SP-1200 ones, the "XmasGift2010" pack and the "SP1200 vs MBase1" pack): http://www.goldbaby.co.nz/freestuff.html
    Last edited by scutheotaku; 30th Jun 2012 at 05:49.
    Pasta!

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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

    Holy ice cream cake! Oh my, where to begin here...

    you definitely don't need it. You can get by using software alone.
    That's a bit of a relief, i'm practically software based at the moment and i'm getting good at it.

    Daft Punk's Discovery album features heavy use of the SP-1200 too. Their Homework album seems to mostly feature the SP-12 IIRC.
    As for hardware i'm no wiz at it, i only know Akai, this drum machine called the Tempest and a TRAKTOR turntable. I'm just in it for the fun if or when i buy hardware, plus i would like to learn live mixing as well.

    Check out this video to see Alan Braxe briefly demonstrating SP-1200 (using his classic track with Fred Falke, "Intro")
    Thanks for the link, i could really use some knowledge for the hardware you were mentioning. I mostly see the SP-1200, is that overall good?

    (and probably led to a lot of the more organic arrangements that are prevalent in French House)
    So to produce a more organic sounding French House, i would need say a hardware like the SP-1200 or simply the modern MIDI Controller?

    they are expensive
    Oh i know, but mainly i want hardware for experimentation like a MIDI Controller, and also for playing live as well such as a modern turntable or controller.

    a good software bit crusher
    Oh i have a lot of bit crushers VSTs and to be honest, i can't tell the difference apart from some crushed hi-hats. I didn't learn music theory, i just played it by ear from a headphone or speakers.

    (though I'm not sure how shopping on eBay works in Malaysia?)
    It's pretty much the same as regular eBay but it's pretty rare to find these equipments because of the rarity of DJs in the country, most of them are software based and experimenting a lot on dubstep just weeks after Skrillex's "My Name Is Skrillex" video was released on YouTube.

    (the Turbo is an upgraded SP-12, kind of a "SP-12 Model 2")
    Are there any significant differences between the SP-1200 and the Turbo?

    When sampling off of vinyl, the producers would often speed the vinyl up
    Like a couple of semitones up?

    You can actually do a similar thing in software and get a somewhat similar sound.
    Yes i have, but to my knowledge only with semitones.

    you may want to look at Ableton Live
    Oh i see, one question though, is PreSonus One similiar to Ableton Live? Because that seems to fit my budget at the moment.

    And also, how is it used? Is it a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation)?

    and even some free ones
    You've had me at "some free ones", thanks again.

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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

    I'll answer each of your points, point-by-point

    Yep, you can do it all through software. Hardware does tend to have its own sound and quirks, which, along with the addition of a tactitle interface (e.g. knobs) and the limitations, can have a big influence on the sound of your music, how you approach music, your arrangements, etc...

    I'm not familiar with the Tempest, though that doesn't mean anything good or bad. Akai is a good brand - they have some of the best drum pads around! Keep in mind that newer samplers (anything after the early ninties) sound much more "sterile" like a computer, so you won't get that gritty sound that you get from units like the E-mu SP-1200 or the old Akai MPC and S samplers. That being said, the newer Akai samplers are still great in the way that the let you play the tracks. Native Instruments' Maschine, while basically just a MIDI controller that hooks up to special software on your computer, gives you that feel too, though again without the old school sound.

    The SP-1200 was kind of the standard for French House/Filter House. I mean, they did use other samplers like the smaller SP-12, the Akai MPC60, the MPC1000, the ASR sampler (don't remember the full name), the AKai S900 and Akai S950 rackmounted samplers - but the SP-1200 was probably the most common. Like I had mentioned before, the SP-1200 is *the* Roule drum sound.

    You don't need hardware to produce a more organic sounding arrangement, though it certainly helps. You definitely don't need it. Did you notice how Alan Braxe "played" the SP-1200 in his video, or how the others played it in the other videos I linked to? Putting a song together like that feels a lot different from putting together blocks on a screen. It makes it a lot easier to get an organic arrangement, because you're playing it organically. Also, you don't need old hardware to get this organic feel with hardware. Something like Maschine or, if they are compatible with Acid Pro, Launchpad and the APC controllers would work great for this. Akai also makes MPC controllers that are just MIDI controllers you hook to your computer. If I were you, I would seriously consider looking into Maschine.

    Yep for experimentation and playing live, MIDI controllers like Maschine, Akai drum pad MIDI controllers, the APC midi controllers, and the Novation Launchpad controller would all work great. Keep in mind to make sure that these MIDI controllers are compataible with your software of choice (for example, I'm not sure that the Novation Launchpad will work right or even be useful with ACID Pro).

    Yeah, for a software bit crusher I'd recommend something like Decimort (I linked to it before). THat simulates the whole hardware circuit of an old digital sampler instead of just bit crushing.

    I'll do a basic rundown of features between the SP-12, SP-12 Turbo, and the SP-1200:

    ---

    Total sampling time- SP-12: 1.2 seconds; SP-12 Turbo: 5 seconds; SP-1200: 10 seconds.

    Memory- SP-12: 48kb; SP-12 Turbo: 192kb; SP-1200: 256kb.

    Floppy drive (for storing samples)- I believe the SP-1200 uses a standard 3.5" Floppy Disc drive, whereas the SP-12 Turbo uses an old 5.25" drive. IIRC the SP-12 does not have an internal floppy drive, though it did support an external 5.25" floppy drive (one that is probably near impossible to find today). The SP-12 also allowed you to save samples to cassette (yuck!).

    Hard drive- Only the SP-1200 has a hard drive - the other two will only store samples in memory (where they are deleted once you turn it off), on floppy discs or on cassette. It's (barely) worth mentioning that the SP-1200 does not support cassette storage.

    ---

    Outside of those differences, and the SP-1200 being much bigger in size and having a slightly lower sample rate, the three units are pretty much the same. The have the same filters, swing, tuning method (which is very unique), etc...

    Long story short, if you want an SP unit, then get a SP-12 if you only want to do drum sounds and short hits. Get a SP-12 Turbo if you either want to do drums and short hits only, or if you want to do longer loops only - you won't have the sampling time to do both at the same time. Get the SP-1200 if you want more of an "all-in-one" unit that will let you do drums and loops at the same time (though of course you'll still be limited by the 10 second sample time). More generally, if you can't afford the SP-1200, get a SP-12 Turbo or an Akai MPC60. If you can't afford the SP-12 Turbo or a MPC60, get a SP-12 or a Akai S900, Akai S950, or a E-mu Emax (which apparently sounds almost identical to the SP series).

    Here are some links that you may found helpful:
    http://www.vintagesynth.com/emu/sp1200.php
    http://www.vintagesynth.com/emu/sp12.php
    http://www.beatstatus.com/2009/04/re...-of-the-price/
    http://www.gearslutz.com/board/so-mu...sp-1200-a.html

    On pitching the vinyls up, they would probably just change the speed on their turntable from 33 RPM mode to 45 RPM mode - I'm not sure how many semitones that would speed it up though. There is also usually a +/- 8% dial that would change the speed by plus or minus 8%, so I'm sure that was used too.

    Searching on Google seems to show that playing a 33 record at 45 rpm pitches it up by about 5 semitones (e.g. a C note becomes a F), give or take a few cents. As far as the +/- 8% thing, that depends on the turntable and how its pitch control is calibrated. So, to simulate this on software, I'd just go with pitching it up 5 semitones (making sure that it speeds up in the process, i.e. don't use ACID's feature where it changes pitch without changing speed), bouncing that to audio, then pitching it back down by whatever you want (again, making sure to change the speed at the same time).

    As far as I know, the PreSonus One software is not that similar to Ableton Live. PreSonus One seems more like Cubase or Logic. Ableton Live works a lot differently. I suggest you download the demo and check it out, maybe watch a few tutorial videos on YouTube. At the very least, Ableton Live is great for live use; but many (most?) Ableton Live users also use it for full track producing.

    And yep, Ableton Live is a full DAW.

    You can download a demo of Ableton Live here: http://www.ableton.com/download-live-trial

    Another alternative would be FL Studio. A lot of the newer geneartion of French House producers use FL Studio, with Louis La Roche and Madeon being notable examples. It's pretty affordable too, with the full Producer Edition (the edition you'd want to get) being only $199.99 USD. It's worth mentioning that a lot of The Daft Club users make their music in FL Studo.

    You can grab a demo of FL Studio here: http://image-line.com/downloads/flstudiodownload.html


    EDIT:
    If you want to go the old-school hardware sampler route, then here are some other old ones that have a nice sound:

    http://www.vintagesynth.com/ensoniq/asr10.php <<<another classic sampler, very popular in hip hop

    http://www.vintagesynth.com/akai/mpc60.php <<<the three MPCs I have linked here are classics. Every hip hop producers wants one of each . The MPC60 has a very dirty sound, kind of noisy. The other two are much cleaner but still have a grit about them.
    http://www.vintagesynth.com/akai/mpc3000.php
    http://www.vintagesynth.com/akai/mpc2000.php

    http://www.vintagesynth.com/emu/emax.php <<<apparently sounds nearly identical to the SP samplers

    http://www.vintagesynth.com/akai/s900.php <<<usually pretty affordable, though the S950 (which is briefly mentioned on that page) is far better

    http://www.vintagesynth.com/sci/studio440.php <<<very old school in functionality, like the Linn9000 it's probably not even worth mentioning

    http://www.vintagesynth.com/ensoniq/ens_mirage.php <<<great for old school 8-bit sounds
    Last edited by scutheotaku; 30th Jun 2012 at 21:18.
    Pasta!

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    Re: French House Essentials? (French House For Newbies)

    Hey, you're in luck if you want FL Studio. Between today and July 13th, you can use the coupon code "Yardsale2012" and get FL Studio (and other Image-Line software) 40% off. So, FL Studio Producer edition would be only $119 USD! More info here: http://www.image-line.com/documents/..._id=1340159234
    Pasta!

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