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    Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

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    This is going to be mostly chunk by chunk. It still is 1:30 in the morning, and I will need to sleep sometime in the future.
    But here is the begining (no I am not only going straight to the "dialogue"):

    p.74-75
    DAFT PUNK
    --
    The electronic duo decided to engaged against the flow of this period with their fourth album, oldschool superproduction, recorded with instruments and quantities of guests. In galactic exclusivity, Guy-Manuel and Thomas explain themselves.

    --

    Welcome to the 21th Century, friend readers. Sit down in the theird millenium, yes, on the rug, we hear the basses much better.
    Our story begins March 3rd 1951, in a freezing studio in Memphis, Tennessee. Ike Turner and his band set their gear at 706 Union Avenue. The producer is Sam Phillips, only 28 years old, he'll found Sun Records a year later. While Jackie Brenston heats his voice, a problem appears: guitarist Willie Kizart's amplifier died in the travel. We try... The amp spits, but Sam Phillips laughs, amused, he suggests to keep it on the tape.
    The title "Rocket 88" recorded that day by the small team is considered par numerous historians like the first tangible moment of a rock'N'roll recording, because of this accidental distortion, boosting the band's sound. The story repeats itself in 1958, and this time it's the Indian Shawnee Link Wray who stabs with a screwdriver multiple holes in the speaker of his amplifier so that it can make a curious fuzzy sound " that reproduces in studio the noise of live". Comes out Phil Spector, first mad scientist of pop: considering that two drummers make a lot more noise than one, he builds a wall of sound with two drummers, four pianist, five guitar players, and seveteen tembourines. Not so practical.

    ---


    In Great Britain, another pioneer named Joe Meek builds echoe chambers, distortion and sampling. His glorious achievement ("Telstar") doesn't stop him from commiting suicide in 1967. What follows is known. The little fuzz pedal becomes an institution with "(I can't get no) Satisfaction", first signature of Keith Richards who's got for pal the opening of the Pandora box of sound. From the boom of the sixties bands, we remember The Who, first of alls to burn their instruments in the search of the red barbarian note in touch with their speed drugs, but also The Troggs, this evidence.
    Jimi Hendrix (again an Indian, Cherokee), will be the one to contribute the most: wah-wah, Univibe and suramplification, Hendrix spreads fire to thousands of guitarists, an army of guitar explorers. He leaves a perfect testimonial, the double album "Electric Ladyland."

    Lou Reed, John Cale and Zappa work in dementic atmospheres and accoustic ambiances. Golry and honnor to Velvet Underground and to the émothers Of Invention. Pink Flyd spatializes our little rooms and finally popularize (?) the sterophony. But we should mention Dylan, always in search of what he called "the very subtle sound of Mercury", the Beatles and the labyrinthic "Revolution N.9".
    Grows crazy and very talented students of the second generation: The Move, little pop masters, whom 45" revives the Beatles'dream recently evaporated.
    In Detroit since 1969, the Stooges are the first garage band to benefit from the fat sound. They create a (messed up) frustrated sound, primal, urban that will be the generator of the future punk revolution.
    Jimmy Page, since the first Led Zeppelin tour, builds the song "Dazed and confused" that lasts more than twenty minutes in certain concerts and includes the use of the Theremin, mixed to the feedback of the guitar.
    White Noise, first group "all synthesiser" experience, releases on Island the album "An Electronic Storm" (1969), that strangely mixes infra-sounds and recording of sexual exctasy, with many groupies consents.
    Since many years, all soundic Europe envied us Pierre Henry (from Groupe de Recherche sur les Musiques Concretes -Research Group on Concrete Musics), "Ceremony", his collaboration with Spooky Touch, stays inforgettable, given an only time in concert at the Olympia.
    In Febuary 1973, your host is seated in the ampitheater of the faculty of Nanterre. Everybody is here: Paul Alessandrini, Jean-Francois Bizot, Richard Pinhas, JP Lentin, Jacno, Maxime Schmitt, etc, when arrives in a gritty sound the duo Kraftwerk, and the first wall of synthetic machines.... Kraftwerk takes again the revolution where it almost started.
    Really inspired by that krautrock, Jawkwind starts the trend of drones troubled by the claps of synthesisers. Their bassist Lemmy will then further push the concept of "everything louder than anyone" in the Motorhead trio.
    Let's not forget David Bowie who, from 1977 to 1979, gives a last touch on his berlin trilogy, doubled by two elegant Iggy Pop solo albums that works, between shhhs (?) and parasistes, an ultra modern and blowing rock, with the help of the usual suspects: Brian Eno and Robert Fripp.
    Of all punk bands, we mention Sex Pistols, because of the inoxydable sound wall that created Chris Thomas, ingeneer of the Beatles and Pink Floyd, for them...
    --
    p.76-77 to come in next message.
    -Gods among us-

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    Re: Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

    You sir are a god among us

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    Re: Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

    This is quite long... Geez, this guy uses so much words that don't even add up... What a douche

    Part of page 76:

    but also the Pistols were going to make born Public Image, monumental sonic boom that blends toxic guitars, dub basses, primal screams. "The Metal Box" is a new peak in the sound saga, finally making the link between the whitest rock and the blackest musics.
    On the side of the funky brothers, we didn't stay stunned at the Apollo. James Brown synthesised funk since "Papa's Got A Brand New Bag" (1965) and Hendrix opened the gates of powerful deliriums (Funkadelic, Parliament, Bootsy Collins, Earth Wind and Fire). Sly Stone incarnated a real tall sorcerer. His voodoo cauldron where grew a black and white gumbo, rock and funk, synths and clavecins seduced the massive crowds since Woodstock. Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones, Curtis Mayfield, Barry White, Norman Whitfield, Isaac Hayes: architects of sound.
    Hendrix the Cherokee is the inital inspiration of Nile Rodgers (a quarter indian himself, of course) who, with his father Bernard Edwards, invents a sonic combination of ultimate funk, the Chic Organization, who will be known a successful formula (Sister Sledge, Diana Ross, Bowie, Madonna, Duran Duran).
    In Europe, an Italian nammed Georgio Moroder gets Munich on the map of world sound capital. He records the singer Donna Summer in plain orgasm (definetively) and gets from it "Love To Love You", stringy discoid based on a seismic beat of drum that Stones, Rod Stewart and Bowie will know to use. More again than Moroder's kick, the Chic sound touches us and relies on a bass and a guitar, as surely as the sound of Black Sabbath.
    Rock or funk, the giants of sound all knew their glory hour. Notely when Michael Jackson had fun mixing both styles, but let's not anticipate. The Sex Pistols' album made a sweet noise since its release. Frankies Goes to Hollywood double LP would durably mark the next step, the 80's.
    "Welcome To The Pleasure Dome" was a super britannic production and a beautiful trick too: the Yes members went each night remake the kids' parts recorded in the afternoon...
    The trend was stuck. Since 1990, Depeche Mode stabbed "Violator", fundemental album where the synths were stumped on like guitars. In hommage to Bowie and Kraftwerk, U2 accomplishes the really probant (?) "Achtung Baby". In America, Trent Reznor opens lots of roads but sinke at the gate of the masterpiece long awaited (fail of "The Fragile").
    -Gods among us-

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    Re: Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

    gahh this is torture not even a mention of DP yet!
    Thomas Bangalter on EDM - "Maybe it's just one guy called Eric David Morris."
    http://www.facebook.com/davidboin95
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    Re: Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

    Second part of page 76, only mentionning (WUT!!) Daft Punk:

    Hopefully, the 90's propose grunge. The grunge is a delightful combination described by Sub Pop Records as "the meeting of Black Sabbath and the Beatles". But Kurt Cobain refuses the new and problematic challenge of the overrepresentation of rockstars and we know what happened of the new grunge sound and the end of golden age of rock... The outbreak of the machines ideally freezes the debate during seven years (1994-2001).
    1993 important year: Daft Punk begins to pass maxis (EP) in a rave at EuroDisney park, and it's the year "In Utero" got released AND the first Radiohead. Would Cobain work with synths today, like Thom Yorke?
    Understanding that britpop is too nostalgic, the English send suddenly some futurism, some big beat: Prodigy, Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, Tricky. In a first time, a real sibling-y feeling caracterises this new electronic scene that spreads from Europe to Japan via the raves, then the clubs.
    Let's get reassured: the rock came back to make the guitars meow in 2001, with The Strokes, The White Stripes and The Libertines. But here, it was over with the fat sound. Over the search, the studios in lock out and the dement producers. The rare bands still in activity (Strokes, Vaccines, Arctic Monkeys) tend now for a sparkly and less heavier sound, ŕ la Smiths...
    Here, grosso modo, the few reflexions that come through our minds in the elevator of a parisian palace where we are awaited for a two hours interview with Daft Punk, before the release of its new discographic experience, "Random Access Memories", to appear May 21th 2013.

    Let's resume: Ike Turner is no more, Phil Spector is in jail. Have the Daft found a new solution electro-accoustic to restart the f9cking mess?
    It is as painful to you than it is to me XD Getting sick of this tard talking history.
    Last edited by LGND-R; 17th Apr 2013 at 07:24.
    -Gods among us-

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    Re: Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

    Ok, so the interview begins now, right?
    Thomas Bangalter on EDM - "Maybe it's just one guy called Eric David Morris."
    http://www.facebook.com/davidboin95
    https://soundcloud.com/fundave

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    Re: Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

    YEP!
    But i tire-tire now. i go sleepy sleep naow
    Am a bitch to keep ya waiting huh?
    --
    Yeah im really sorry... I could even read the whole thing myself, but in solidarity, i wont, so we both get to the end of it together!
    -Gods among us-

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    Re: Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

    Oh please dude, do it for us!

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    Re: Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

    >translates 2 pages if introduction, 1 mention of DP
    >goes to sleep right at the start of the interview

    that's stone cold man!
    Thomas Bangalter on EDM - "Maybe it's just one guy called Eric David Morris."
    http://www.facebook.com/davidboin95
    https://soundcloud.com/fundave

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    Re: Daft Punk's RockNFolk interview -translated-

    Quote Originally Posted by ScampSixteen View Post
    Oh please dude, do it for us!
    .....grumble grumble.... i'm gonna be a mess, tomorrow....

    FINE.
    -Gods among us-

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