Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. Rep:
    DaftCr3w's Avatar
    Posts
    350
    Points
    1,107
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Default

    Re: Music Express June 2013 Daft Punk Interview

    Remove this ad: become a supporter
    A tool shed with two chairs serves as control centre. That's what TB and GMdHM recently sat on when they were mastering their fourth studio album RAM. There's not only functional sound engineering devices in here. They decorated the walls with pictures of their kids and related robots, Fritz Lang's Maria from 'Metropolis' and R2D2 from George Lucas' 'Star Wars' saga. The Star Wars dvd lies right beside a copy of Tron: Legacy with its DP soundtrack. Their small library contains an album cover book, a copy of 'The Mind' from Time magazine's science series and 'Walker's Rhyming Dictionary of the English Language'. There's a copy of 'Raise!', Earth, Wind & Fire's last album from 1981, in the corner.
    TB starts playing the music, from within the machines. It starts with 'Give Life Back To Music', Vocoder voices, Nile Rodgers' guitar and all sorts of Disco sounds. Later we hear Giorgio Moroder chat about his life for 9 minutes to the corresponding music. The brass and strings, even the handclaps - everything sounds genuine. You get sucked into the 70s, Progressive Rock. It ends with 'Contact', track 13, the famous farewell from the moon by the Apollo 17 crew: 'We leave as we came.' At the end, Daft Punk drive RAm against the wall, the filters give up their ghost, the membranes burst. After 75 minutes runtime.

  2. Like TheGist, On The Fly likes this post
  3. Rep:
    DaftCr3w's Avatar
    Posts
    350
    Points
    1,107
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Default

    Re: Music Express June 2013 Daft Punk Interview

    What's for an album?
    TB: We wonder that, too. That's why we said to ourselves: Let's invite someone who might be able to tell us. But: First of all, this is kind of our first studio album. Until now we were confident handymen. Our current concept is: making music in the studio, recording music, craft, session. Of course, that concept wasnt clear when we started five years ago. Back at that time we just said 'Let's where it'll lead us if dont work at home any more'.

    The title's a joke, right'
    TB: Not really.
    GMdHC: It's a pun.
    TB: Technology and neurology, saving and recollecting. The human brain is fragmented like a hard disk. Memories are fragments, they're random. Every computer term has a human connotation. That says a lot about what computers mean to us. That's not yet got to do with artificial intelligence. It just makes us aware that our relationship to technology is getting more intimate. That would be meta-level of RAM.

    So the album itself is serious?
    TB: No, it's not like that. The relationship between humans and machines is rather playfully, for us as musicians anyway. We like to see this album as a surrealistic painting from Rene Magritte. You can take that as a joke. A guy without a face with an apple on his head.
    GMdHC: Or as a nightmare.

    It's also about the material, the instruments. Has this album really been made in such an analogue way as it sounds?
    TB: To be honest: We used digital hardware for post production. But there arent any digital instruments on this album.

    What's so great about analogue sounds again?
    TB: Let's just call it organic. Today's pop music is being created with computers. Computers themselves arent musical instruments though. They havent been invented for it, thats not why they're being manufactured. They can do all sorts of things. Personally we're interested in equipment whose purpose and function is to make music in the first place. When working on the soundtrack for Tron:Legacy recently, the orchestra tuned in to a C flat major chord. That already was like magic for us. Computers arent capable of doing so. No software emulating a synthesizer and no soundbank will every touch you like a Steinway piano will. It's about feelings. This doesnt mean you cant create someting with digital means. But you can express yourself as a musician using analogue equipment. It's like cooking: You can make a meal using cheap ingredients, but it wont be a proper dish. Analogue isnt a myth. When Nile Rodgers is playing guitar, he's just playing the guitar and the recording will catch the moment.
    GMdHC: His mood.
    TB: It cant be repeated. With a computer you work completely virtual. It's very easy but also very sad. It's like the 'Truman Show'. You create an artificial world, save it and shut the pc. When you open the pc again, the world's exactly the same again. But thats not what life's like. Its not a virtual reality, even if a lot of people say so. Our album is made up of snapshots that can be repeated. It's still there but it wont happen like that again.

  4. Like On The Fly likes this post
  5. Rep:
    On The Fly's Avatar
    Posts
    352
    Points
    1,173
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Russia
    Default

    Re: Music Express June 2013 Daft Punk Interview

    is that all?

  6. Rep:
    DaftCr3w's Avatar
    Posts
    350
    Points
    1,107
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Default

    Re: Music Express June 2013 Daft Punk Interview

    no, there's more to come

  7. Like On The Fly likes this post
  8. Rep:
    DaftCr3w's Avatar
    Posts
    350
    Points
    1,107
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Default

    Re: Music Express June 2013 Daft Punk Interview

    What is it that determines if you simulate strings with the synthesizer or if you record real strings?
    Thomas: Whenever you can hear strings on the album, they're real. Sometimes they sound like a synthesizer, that's true. But that again does say a lot.


    The supposedly most sold record in House music comes from Thomas Bangalter. 1998 saw the release of Stardust's 'Music Sounds Better With You', a side project of Daft Punk. That track was based on Chaka Khan's 'Fate' from 1981. It remained with one track released using that cleverly used sample. 2 years later Daft Punk released 'One More Time', they used analogue synthesizers and tried to give their songs a more structured build than on their previous album Homework with 'Around The World'. Discovery, the second album from 2001, was a sampling orgy: They were the first who were allowed to test the Roland VP 9000. Using it they built their songs. They let their guests sing to samples of George Duke and Barry Manilow. Human After All, their last studio album from 2005, almost entirely worked without any samples. There weren't any singles, no videos, no interviews, just a ringtone and a message on the internet: 'Wir sincerely believe our album speaks for itself.'


    The story of Daft Punk is that of robots becoming human.
    Thomas: Ah, I don't know. We always thought of ourselves as musicians. We didn't start with computers but with old drum machines and synthesizers.
    Guy-Man: And samplers.
    Thomas: Those were our interfaces between mankind, machines and music. The robots were our aesthetics, not our program. Working with drummers and bassists now, it remains the same. Our music always was human and not formatted like modern computer based pop music. For us, it's about the performance nowadays.

    Is it about Disco?
    Thomas: See that as you like. If you want to call RAM a disco album, call it that.

    A Prog Disco album.
    Guy-Man: Progressive funk with rock vibes. We just make music and see what comes around eventually.

    The guitar on the first track, 'Give Life Back To Music', is that Nile Rodgers?
    Thomas: Oh yeah, that's him.

    Because Nile Rodgers has always seen modern dance music as craft?
    Thomas: We wanted to work, really work with musicians that we appreciated as musicians and persons. Nile is an unbelievable guitarist, song writer and producer.
    Guy-Man: A nice guy.
    Thomas: A soul. When we started, we were 20. Now we're nearly 40 and mature enough to work with a 60 years old guy. Or with Giorgio Moroder who is 72. Age differences are becoming blurred for us. Ten years ago it would have been to early, in ten years might be to late.

    'Good Times' made Nile Rodgers famous and the 'Good Times' sample in Sugarhill Gang's first Hip Hop track 'Rapper's Delight' gave everlasting fame to him.
    Guy-Man: The sampler invented Rap music!

    Are there really no samples on RAM?
    Thomas: No, everything's been recorded.
    Guy-Man: That's not true: There are two samples on track 13, the last track. One's from the band The Sherbs and the other one's a radio message from Apollo 17. We sampled a lot in the last 20 years, we gave distinction to the sampling culture. Now we made an album that can be used for sampling. I want to explicitly call on everybody to sample our songs!
    Thomas: That would be another way to describe the album. We always had this line on mind, that border between old and new music. Today we use audiophile recording technology that existed before the digital revolution. This is music that can only be done in teamwork. With musicians, audio engineers, producers. Back in the days you would have called it modern classics. You call it Disco.

  9. Like DAFTFOEVER, On The Fly likes this post
  10. Rep:
    CJVercetti's Avatar
    Posts
    1,764
    Points
    4,339
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Poo Jersey
    Default

    Re: Music Express June 2013 Daft Punk Interview

    Is that it then?
    Staight Outta Compton.

  11. Rep:
    DaftCr3w's Avatar
    Posts
    350
    Points
    1,107
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Default

    Re: Music Express June 2013 Daft Punk Interview

    Still 2 or 3 pages left

  12. Like On The Fly likes this post
  13. Rep:
    On The Fly's Avatar
    Posts
    352
    Points
    1,173
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Russia
    Default

    Re: Music Express June 2013 Daft Punk Interview

    Le bump
    sorry translators :>

  14. Like jsaid001 likes this post
  15. Rep:
    On The Fly's Avatar
    Posts
    352
    Points
    1,173
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Russia
    Default

    Re: Music Express June 2013 Daft Punk Interview

    B.u.m.p.
    :3

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Dazed & Confused: Moroder vs. The Machines June 2013
    By TheGist in forum Interviews/Media Appearences
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 20th Feb 2014, 19:09
  2. Daft Punk featured in Floornet June '13 issue Japan [pics]
    By piroteki in forum Interviews/Media Appearences
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 14th May 2013, 09:51
  3. "Future, Again!" - Music Express, February 2011
    By ifcwdjd in forum Interviews/Media Appearences
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 30th Jul 2012, 08:03
  4. Daft Punk interview in "The Evolution of Electronic Dance Music?"
    By CherieD'Amoure in forum Interviews/Media Appearences
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 17th Jun 2012, 23:27