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    Humo: exclusive interview with Daft Punk + album review

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    http://www.humo.be/humo-archief/240545/daft-punk


    Belgian magazine 'Humo'

    The issue is out since today, stores aren't open here anymore, I'll get it tomorrow.

    Here the translation of the review (online).

    Quote Originally Posted by Humo
    The promo campaign for ' Random Access Memories ' , the first record of Daft Punk in eight years, looks a lot like a precision bombing with cluster-ammunition: no speaker that hasn’t spitted the wonderfully funky single ' Get Lucky ' yet, and also the internet is full of advertising banners and teaser clips for what has to become the electronic record of the year. Humo flew to Los Angeles for a listening session and an interview with the Parisian duo Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo .

    It were the guest musicians who broke the long silence after the live album “Alive 2007”: singer-songwriter Paul Williams was the first one to state that he had worked with the robot duo, later, disco and funk legend Nile Rodgers stated that he had sat in the studio with the French. Last month, a website was unveiled with a simple animation (' fully hand-made, there is no computer involved!" says someone from the entourage) including a loop from a new number was mounted – the single 'Get Lucky', we now know now.

    'Why don’t we promote the chaos to concept?'

    Then followed the first of a series of movies in which the many guest musicians explain why the French duo writes music history. And it is not the least: in addition to Williams and Rodgers, they worked with electronica-grandfather Giorgio Moroder, rap producer Pharrell ‘Neptunes’ Williams, Panda Bear from indie rockers Animal Collective en Julian ‘The Strokes’ Casablancas.
    Hear first, then believe – how that record sounded, there had even the press guessing. There were no promo CDs sent out, not even a streaming link. Humo was able to exactly hear it one time, in the presence of two members of the American record company. Sweetened: we could make to Los Angeles, and got an exclusive interview with Thomas and Guy-Manuel.

    First stop: Henson Recording Studios in Hollywood, a very old studio complex where among others – feel free to fall straight back and keep us company on the cold concrete floor – The Carpenters , Joni Mitchell , Fleetwood Mac , The Police , Guns N ' Roses and Alice In Chains songs recordings. I put myself in an Office Chair for a wall-to-wall mixing console, someone from the record label presses 'play'
    A lethargic discogroove waves from the speakers: inaction is impossible, it swings like the plague.
    I hear no samples, only real drums, a real bass and especially the funky rhythm guitar: an old-fashioned groove cuts in thick paste, melancholic and which makes me have tears in my eyes.The Jet lag, I think. But then the vocodersvoice kicks in – 'Let the music in tonight/Just turn on the music/Let the music of your life/Give life back to music ' – and does it whoooooooooooooeeeeeeeesj in my head.
    I am six years old and stare out the window of the parental living room. Outdoor walking the seventies on their last legs, ‘Reggatta de Blanc plays’ in my headphones from The Police, *my first favorite band. Before I can suppress the surge of melancholy, it does again this whooooooeeeeeesj in my head: this time I’m 16, I sit in a car with lowered windows, on my way to a party where some unreachable girls hang around, after tonight, everything will be different.
    Whooooooeeeeesj! The next hour I fall from one surprise to another: an insanely beautiful ode to the aforesaid Giorgio Moroder- (‘ Giorgio by Moroder '); a loony opera in which I tumble of cosmic Musik in musical bombast and hip hop (' Touch '); science fiction sounds to dream away ('Motherboard '); a breathtaking space safari (' Contact '). As the last light pulse in the distance is extinct, it feels like the great Glenn Gould has danced once or a hundred on and off on my emotional keyboard. In pin table terms: TILT.
    So yeah, more tomorrow.
    Last edited by Daft is my Life; 14th May 2013 at 19:32.


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    Re: Humo: exclusive interview with Daft Punk + album review

    I bought it today! Great interview.

    Kinda funny that they had to make a trip to LA to interview them. Belgium<=>France ...
    Last edited by Justin Case; 14th May 2013 at 18:59.
    *Music Is Heroin For My Ears*
    "Once you free your mind about the concept of music being correct, you can do whatever you want. There is no preconception of what to do." - Giorgio Moroder


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    Re: Humo: exclusive interview with Daft Punk + album review

    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Case View Post
    I bought it today! Great interview.

    Kinda funny that they had to make a trip to LA to interview them. Belgium<=>France ...
    Cool! Any pictures? Then scanscanscanscanscanscanscan plz


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    Re: Humo: exclusive interview with Daft Punk + album review

    Scans:

















    Working on a translation, gimme some time


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    Re: Humo: exclusive interview with Daft Punk + album review

    ah thanks don't have to buy a humo now, even though its a good magazine

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    Re: Humo: exclusive interview with Daft Punk + album review

    TRANSLATION, Daft Punk interview only

    Quote Originally Posted by Humo
    Going further from page 147:

    Worse than a renovation
    Barely an hour later, second stop: a private bungalow from the ancient hotel Chateau Marmont. Even here is the dust that whirls up in the dying afternoon sun pregnant from history: Jim Morrison tried here during a fierce LSD-trip to climb a rain pipe up, the guys from Led Zeppelin drove with their motorcycles through the lobby, comedian John Belushi took his last speedball here, Hunter S. Thompson once shattered a window here.
    <p148>
    Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo welcome me warmly – sans robot helmets, or what did you expect? Guy-Man talks especially with his eyes, he’ll drop only one word, but Thomas compensates that plenty. He apologizes for the long journey and the short interview time.
    Thomas Bangalter: I wish I had two hours to explain everything completely, but in compensation I’ll talk as fast as possible, bon?

    HUMO: Splendid. After ‘Human After all’, you didn’t sit still: there was the film ‘Electroma’, the ‘Alive’-tour and the soundtrack from ‘Tron Legacy’. But isn’t eight years a bit long for a new record?
    TB: Makin records is a bit like doing renovations in your house. You start with a lot of courage, and you hope that your friends are wrong when they warn that you’ll be gone for years. Gradually you have to admit that it was all a lot worse (laughs).
    Five years ago we decided to go in a studio to experiment, without a clear plan. We only knew what we didn’t want to do: repeat ourselves. Well yeah: as usually we started working with our laptops, drum machines and synthesizers, but we soon felt that our story was told. Then came the offer to write the soundtrack from ‘Tron Legacy’, and a whole world opened. When you have composed tracks for a big orchestra, you’re not going to **** around in your home studio with drum machines and synths eh. You see it suddenly bigger then: your own songs, written in collaboration with a bunch of singers and produces that you admire yourself, and let the whole thing be played by the best musicians in the world!
    Well, easier said than done though. Okay: we’re in a luxury position, because a lot of artists would like to work with us, and the doors we lean on to go open easily. But in the beginning it was especially a very chaotic affair: it looked like that we never could cram those wide flared musical adventures in to one packet – read: a record. Until it began to dawn: why don’t we promote the chaos to concept? After all you couldn’t see the human brain as a fragmented hard drive, full of thoughts and memories that you can recall as much as you want: you can jump from branch to branch, but despite that discretion you feel something with it. Problem: you can’t mix some random ingredients and hope that the result touches the right chord from the listener. So we had to make tracks that simulated that that mechanism of randomness, whereby you would think about something that makes you think about something else. Are you still following?

    HUMO: Absolutely, but it sounds so reasoned. I was actually feeling stuff when I listened to ‘Random Access Memories’.
    TB: (exchanges a triumphal glance with De Homem-Christo) Beautiful. What am I saying, wonderful!
    Guy-Man: (nods heavily) Cray-zee!
    TB: You know how we see it? On ‘Random Access Memories’ you fly from here to there while present, past and future blend together. It’s a portal to a timeless zone wherein as well as Giorgio Moroder, Nile Rodgers as Julian Casablancas live next to each other. With this record we want to demolish the barriers between musical genres and eras: nobody has to stay stuck for the rest of his life in the quicksand from one or another era. We also don’t want to forever belong to the nineties, and more specific: the period from the French touch. Mind you: we don’t want to deny the present. ‘Random Access Memories’ is not a nostalgic record: we try with a deep rooted knowledge from the past to make the music from the present. And hopefully we can by that way give structure to the music from the future.

    Living with the classics <p148-149-150>
    HUMO: You’re almost forty: old enough to carry the weight of the electronic music history on your shoulders, no?
    TB: Oh man, you have no idea how long we talked about hat! I said a moment ago that we started with ‘Random Access Memories’ without a lot of stress, but after a while I became very aware of from the pressure from the past. How in god’s name do you compete with all those fantastic records from the past decades? When we grew up – I’m counting you in as well, we’re clearly from the same generation – the records we bought took us to another dimension. When you went to a concert, it always disappointed, because there was nothing like listening to the record in the seclusion of your room. These days it’s the other way around: lots of colleagues put everything on their concerts; they try to create the magic there. Flipside of the coin: their record is usually nothing more than a vehicle to decorate their performances. Okay: they succeed in ignoring the pressure from the past completely, but at the same time they lower the bar. There stands an invisible wall between the classics – those hundreds, thousands of magical beautiful records that can bring whole generations in agitation – and the tremendous earth-like records that are made today. You can almost hear the creators think out loud: ‘Meh, we would never reach that magic of yesteryear. Let us just do normal, that’s already crazy enough.’ Sorry, but then you can just throw in the towel.

    HUMO: Never considered of stopping with Daft Punk?
    TB: No. We did seriously wonder if we should bring out another album. After all that’s a relic from the past: on an LP fits something of a forty-five minutes, on a CD seventy, so you’d have to make sure you could tell your story in that amount of time. You don’t have to take that technical limitation in consideration anymore: thanks to the internet you can in a manner of speaking tie the public around you 360 degrees. If you do make a record, you chose for a story with a beginning and an end, end of line.
    Furthermore, we did already make three records that according to some people are ehm, important and influenced a lot of younger musicians: we didn't immediately felt the need to add another one. But eventually our ambition got the upper hand: we were going to demolish that wall between the records from the past and present, hop! And if we slipped on our way, we wouldn't release anything. And then those hours of studio sessions with Nile and Giorgio would just be nice stories to tell the grandchildren (laughs). Anyways, we’re very happy that it led to something eventually. You won’t hear me claiming that ‘Random Access Memories’ will be better than those thousands of other records that are going to be released this year, but we’re proud that it is made with the same care as lots of those classics.

    HUMO: You can explain that.
    TB: We have worked with old equipment that already has proved its usefulness completely, and we let everything being played by some old dogs from the business. Not really revolutionary, but nobody does it in our genre. Daft Punk has from in the earliest beginnings rowed against the flow. ‘Homework’ was established in our bedroom, using computers and software: a tough job, because the technology then wasn’t as user-friendly as now. ‘Random Access Memories’ lies in the same approach as our earlier work: we observe very well what happens around us en then try to color outside the lines. Only then you can offer the public something unique.
    By the way: it’s not because we have used analog instruments that we didn’t have eye for the present technology. ‘Touch’ is for example recorded on 250 tracks: you couldn’t do that forty years ago, nobody could link eleven 24-tracktaperecordes together. But we have taken care that the technology is made as invisible as possible, a bit like the CGI in ‘The Lord of the Rings’. In a lot of modern music the technology smokes almost in your face, she’s more than a means. The downside is that software incredibly fast ages, whereby tracks that sound today very modern will in five years be hopelessly outdated. We don’t want to fall for that trap.

    Surprise! <p150-151>
    HUMO: According to producer Todd Edwards – heard previously on ‘Face to Face’ and here on the Doobie Brothers likely ‘Fragments of Time’ – you aim for a typical West Coast-vibe. Could you also have made the record in Paris?
    TB: Oh, but we did make a lot of it in Paris: the preproduction, de vocodervoices, and the final touch. And the songs with Pharrell and Panda Bear are from a to z Parisian productions. We did all the rest of it in New York and LA. In the studio where you heard the record a moment ago, we recorded our rough demos: piano, drums and some keyboards.

    HUMO: As when you were playing in the rock band Darlin’.
    TB: Something like that. With this difference: then we had to do everything alone, now we could on a given moment call in guest musicians that played a hundred times better than we did. Why would you play guitar yourself if Nile Rodgers and Paul Jackson Jr. (session guitarist for i.e. Michael Jackson, red.) are in the neighborhood? There are however a few pieces on ‘Random Access Memories’ of guitar and piano we played ourselves.

    HUMO: In the spacey final track ‘Contact’ you shoot along the atmosphere, circling around the moon for a few times en then return to Earth. Can’t be else than inspired by ‘Goldorak’ (De Homem-Christo draws big eyes and smiles wide), that old cartoon series whereof we know you’re big fans of it.
    TB: (smiles as wide as his companion) We were as children very big fans of it indeed: it can’t be else than it slips into our creative output. Our music, video clips, movies, live shows and our persona with the robot helmets betray everything about the popular culture that we breathed in as a child, and about the things where we’re still keen on. We shuffle them among each other as well: science fiction, Japanese anime, esotericism and psychedelics, name it. On paper a pretty weird combination, but I think we always succeed in making a compact entirety of it. Or take the list with guest musicians on ‘Random Access Memories’: it shoots in all directions, it’s like the cast from a film by Quentin Tarantino. But eventually that tremendous weird but unique hybrid gets you in it: that is at least the goal.

    HUMO: I’ve heard the record only once, but I know one thing: people will be surprised. Or scared.
    TB: As long as they know we were as well (laughs). Seriously: it’s not obvious that you after twenty years in music business still can be equally enthusiastic and tensioned about what you do. As in it’s not obvious that people still know who we are at all.
    HUMO: (laughs)
    TB: But I mean that! We chose years ago for living in anonymity – you don’t see our face in the media, like lots of other colleagues. Furthermore, we release new stuff in dribs and drabs, we don’t put each new snippet on Twitter or Facebook immediately. Sometimes I get the feeling we live in another time dimension.

    HUMO: One in which no exchangeable records are released, only musical benchmarks.
    TB: That’s an ehm, interesting opinion.
    HUMO: Never confuse opinions with facts.
    TB: If you say so (s:wow::wow::wow::wow::wow::wow:s). You know: we’re sincerely honored that we can reach such a big group of people with our music; I know enough talented artists that aren't in that luxury position. Flipside of the coin: we can’t permit ourselves to come out with half finished work; we always have to go at full power. Read: experiment, take risks! Earlier all groups did that, but the current state of the music industry paralyzes the creativity: lots of musicians just don’t dare it anymore to take risks, because if their record fails, they won’t be allowed to make another one. No, then The Beatles: they broke every rule in the manual and constantly tried crazy things: with that approach they never made the same record twice. And that wasn't some unknown band that came up in the margin: no, the whole world looked upon their shoulders! The same for Pink Floyd or Led Zeppelin. We are happy to draw inspiration from them. And hopefully the public takes its time to create a bond with ‘Random Access Memories’.
    On the other hand, this is just some talk afterwards. You don’t have to know this as a listener: the only thing that matters is the music, and you have to be able to admire it with your brain shut down completely.

    THE END
    Last edited by Daft is my Life; 16th May 2013 at 14:36.


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    Re: Humo: exclusive interview with Daft Punk + album review

    Beautiful
    check out my Soundcloud if u like

    https://soundcloud.com/julesmercertunez



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    Re: Humo: exclusive interview with Daft Punk + album review

    Nice job! Thanks for the translation

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